Research Institute

What

Since April 2011, the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis (ISEA) has offered science and research based spatial analysis and forecasts of economic phenomena. We focus on salient issues such as employment and unemployment, housing, retail, logistics, industry analysis, and economic risk assessment. We attempt to provide analyses that are understandable and accessible to the interested public, but that also offer insights to the professional and specialist in the field.

Where

“Location, location, location.” Everyone who has been in the market for buying real estate has been confronted with this mantra by his or her agent. But location does not only matter for real estate. It matters for many industries, where businesses often cluster near each other to gain competitive advantages. It matters for retailers, whose brick and mortar locations depend on customers within driving distance. It matters for commuters, whose pocketbooks take a hit every time gas prices increase. As you explore the topics we cover, you will notice that all of them have a strong connection to the space people live and work in. We believe that data is best presented at the zip code level.

When

Updates on these topics are provided on a regular basis as new data become available. For example, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics releases employment and wage data once a month. Fresh data on income and wealth distribution are available once a year. Consequently, certain reports are available on a monthly basis, while others will only be updated annually. You can find an entire schedule of our report releases on our calendar, located on the bottom of each page on our site.

Why

Why does an economy grow or shrink? It is easy to forget that an economy is not a person who makes independent decisions, but an aggregate of the uncountable number of decisions made by consumers, producers and other economic agents. These interactions are constantly in flux and can vary across geography. Even national policies can affect local economies differently. For example, if interest rates go up, buying a house on credit becomes more expensive. A family may have to search for a smaller house, one in a different neighborhood, requiring a longer drive, in a school district of different quality, and so forth. Thus, it is important to gain economic insight at a finer geographic scale than the national, state or even county level. We provide zip code economic data to serve regional, national and global communities in their needs to better understand how socio-economic phenomena affect and are affected by their communities and the space they live in.

About The Institute

Since April 2011, the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis (ISEA) offers science and research based spatial analysis and forecasts of economic phenomena. It resides in the School of Business at the University of Redlands. It focuses on areas of economic analysis that have a strong connection to the space people live in, such as employment and unemployment, housing, retail, logistics, and economic risk assessment. Updates on these topics are provided on a regular basis. ISEA attempts to provide analyses that is understandable and accessible to the interested public, but also offers insights to the professional and specialist in the field. ISEA serves regional, national and global communities in their needs to better understand how socio-economic phenomena affect and are affected by their communities and the space they live in.